Meet the Maker - Scout & Boo

Friday, November 21, 2014
Scout & Boo are husband & wife team, David & Teresa Beswick.  Together they create a range of beautiful ceramics and upcycle furniture with their graphic designs.  We are super delighted to have their work on sale in our Christmas Design Temporium shop this year. We chatted to them both recently about their inspirations and love of good design...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
Scout & Boo are David & Teresa Beswick (and helpful toddler Gracie too). S&B started as a dream whilst living in London 10 years ago, we dreamt of having our own interiors business incorporating recycled pieces and making and designing our own ceramics range and furniture too. We moved to Bradford on Avon six years ago and we’ve been going full time on our dream since June of this year. We have a range of graphic upcycled furniture, artwork, ceramics and lighting, fabrics and our own furniture range will be coming in 2015. 
What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
Teresa: I love the diversity of our work. No two days are the same. One day is working on colour schemes for the furniture and the next is designing packaging for our ceramics line. Bringing together the various aspects of each product to build a brand that we’re happy with inspires me daily. 
David: Having graduated twenty something years ago with a Degree in Furniture Design and spent the last 18 years working as an illustrator and graphic designer, I am now able to bring together my two passions into creating products which utilise both disciplines. Not having a boss to answer to (other than Teresa) gives you free range to explore creative possibilities. It doesn’t always go to plan but the sense of achievement when it does and you finally see a completed piece is unsurpassable. It also enables me to spend more time with my family. 
What is your favourite family Christmas tradition? 
Teresa: Turkey! Got to love the turkey (and sherry for breakfast) This year our daughter will be almost two at Christmas so we’re getting very excited about building some new family traditions with her to help make her some special childhood memories. I’m sure there will be a letter or two to Santa and some homemade decorations. 
David: Baileys Irish Cream! 

What handmade item is high on your Christmas wish list? 
Teresa: Oh so many! I am in love with Mister Finch’s work at the moment and would love one of his very special pieces; maybe a hare, or a bee (or ideally all of them). I’d also quite like a Fornasetti incense burner, I love them a lot. 
David: Gracie made a 2014 calendar at nursery last year, complete with foot print sleigh and hand print reindeer – genius. Can’t wait to see what they come up with this year. 
Do you have any tips on selling over the Christmas period? 
This is our first Christmas for selling so we’re pretty excited about it. We’re focusing on getting our display absolutely perfect along with our packaging and always having a smile. We’re finding organisation is key too. Every element of the brand and what we’re about has to reflect our aspirations to deliver a stylish, quality product. 
If you could choose a fellow artist/maker to collaborate with, who would it be and why? 
David: Growing up in Manchester, it would have to be two designers who have influenced me the most - graphic designer, Peter Saville and interior designer Ben Kelly. Peter Saville designed record sleeves and posters for Factory Records and often used visual references from other genres and historical imagery which he reinterprets in his work. 
Ben Kelly designed the Hacienda nightclub, formerly a yacht showroom. The design utilised the existing industrial structures and materials which he transformed through colour, light and texture. The result was an industrial aesthetic which stayed true to the building’s warehouse origins. This ethos of using existing objects and images and reinterpreting them are what our upcycle projects are all about. Creating pieces to fit in with modern living doesn't necessarily mean throwing out the old, merely reinventing it. Construction methods and materials used in household furniture 50 years ago produced pieces that were made to last. By recycling them we hope that they live on and are used and enjoyed for generations to come. 
Which artist do you find inspiring to follow on Facebook or Twitter? 
Teresa: I love the updates and photography from Mister Finch (as I mentioned before he is a bit of a fave of mine at the moment) he makes me want to get the sewing machine out and start making beautiful work, unlikely as I cannot sew but he inspires me! I also love a local artist Patricia Volk who produces some amazing sculptures and Yvonne Ellen is a new favourite too with her quirky ceramics. 
David: What is Facebook and Twitter? (Social Media-phobe) 
Finally if you could design a Christmas decoration, what would it be and why? 
This is a long-standing joke in our house. The crowning glory on top of our Christmas tree has been a star made out of a green coat hanger that has been with us for 9 years. We really need to make more of an effort this year - saying that I’m quite fond of our slightly imperfect tree topper.

Thank you David & Teresa, we adore your designs.  We are also huge Mister Finch fans here too, those mushrooms!  You can discover the world of Scout & Boo in our Christmas Design Temporium shop which is at The Architecture Centre on Bristol's historic harbourside.

Join us TONIGHT for our shop launch and party!  More information can be found on our Facebook page.

Christmas Design Temporium
The Architecture Centre
Narrow Quay
Bristol

Tues - Sun: 10am - 6pm

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Meet the Maker - Charlotte Filshie

Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Charlotte Filshie's colourful jewellery had us at 'love at first sight'.  Unique and oh so colourful. Her latest range uses the most unusual of materials, so interesting in fact, that we had to find out more...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
Hi! My name is Charlotte Filshie and I design and made jewellery from some odd materials. My current jewellery focuses on wall-covering and vinyl floor tiles. I love the tactile nature and the array of colours and textures of the wall-covering. In the past I have used kitchen bench samples, leather, cork, milk bottles and magazines. 

Apart from creating things what else do you do? 
Since moving to London from Melbourne, Australia I spend a lot of time visiting markets, cooking (and subsequently eating), watching sunsets but never sunrises, travelling, and power watching Netflix. 
When did you know you were an artist/maker? 
I guess I knew I was a maker when I was studying. I don’t really have an artistic background as I favoured graphic design subjects over art at school. I have always helped out friends with wedding invitations and even did my sisters visual communication homework when I was a kid because it was always more fun than my own. 

What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
I love the freedom to create pieces from materials that aren’t normally associate with jewellery. 
Where does your inspiration come from? 
Anything can be inspiration, walking around and seeing graffiti or a building or even just random geometric shapes and patterns. I also use the materials to guide me. When I look at the different patterns, colours and textures of the wall-covering I see different things. Sometimes the materials remind me of things, and sometimes things remind me of the materials. 
Describe your studio or workspace? 
I work from my dining table in London overlooking a bright leafy square, shared garden and balcony. Luckily, I have very good housemates who tolerate me leaving bits of jewellery here and there so I don’t have to completely pack up my equipment every day. 

If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman (dead or alive), who would it be? 
How would you describe your creative process? 
Once I have an idea I get out my folder of wall-covering and flip through to choose colours and textures. I sketch on graph paper and scan the pictures to Illustrator then play around until I am happy. I use the Illustrator images as a template. Sometimes this is a quick process, other times I give up and go back weeks later. 

What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
The pieces I made while studying are very important to me. It reminds me of where I started and how far I have come. 
What do you when you are stuck in a creative rut? 
I usually work on something else until things become clear. If that doesn’t work I take a break and go for a walk or watch some TV. 
Where would you like to be in ten years? 
I would love to have my own shop selling my designs and pieces from other designers and makers.

Thank you Charlotte, for such a cool interview.  We adore your pieces, and have already put some on our Christmas wish lists!  If you too, 'need' a pair of Charlotte's ear-rings, we do!, then head on down to the Made in Britain shop.

Made in Britain
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol

Mon - Sat:  10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm
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Meet the Maker - Stuart Low

Monday, November 17, 2014
We are delighted to share our next Meet the Maker interview.  Stained glass designer, Stuart Low. Stuart's work takes him to some wonderful buildings around the country and we are super happy he also part of our Made in Britain team.  We caught up with him recently to find out more about the man behind the glass...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about what you do?
My name is Stuart Low, I live in Bristol with my wife Ruth and my two daughters Iris and Rosa. I design and make architectural and stained glass to commission for public projects and people's homes, as well as making smaller pieces for shops and galleries. In recent years I've completed glass commissions for the Haematology and Oncology unit at the BRI, St Michael's and All Angels Church in Windmill Hill, Bristol and Salisbury Children's Hospital, amongst others. 
Apart from creating things, what else do you do? 
I like growing things, especially if they can be eaten so have been an allotment holder at Alderman Moors in Bristol for ten years, and given the chance would spend a great deal more of my time there (not in a deck chair or string vest I hasten to add). I like swimming and use my local pool on Dean Lane with all it's character and quirky charm on a weekly basis. Nature, animals and insects have always fascinated me so I would have to say that being outdoors is important to me and perhaps a good antidote to long hours in the studio. Camping, walks, pond dipping and rock pooling with my children are some of my favourite things. 

When did you know you were an artist/maker? 
I think my desire to make and create has always been there and goes right back to childhood. 

What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
Stained glass can be very rewarding to work with. It's interesting to work with a craft that has a 1000 year old history where most of the processes have changed very little to this day. Having the opportunity to make large work that can affect a space or building can be exciting. I used over 25 square meters of coloured glass for Salisbury Children's Hospital and have recently transformed the west end of the Holy Ghost Church in Exmouth with three new glowing windows. Having said that, I've always found as much pleasure in the intimacy of making smaller windows for people's homes or galleries. 
Where does you inspiration come from? 
I enjoy using my phone to store things I notice. Colour combinations, shapes, textures, unusual or surprising and incidental things. My children's drawings often inspire me. 
Describe your studio or workspace? 
I have two spaces. One is a small garden workshop with two light boxes and my kiln, it backs on to the railway line and is great in the summer, but cups of tea in the sun can be a distraction. My other and most used space is at BV Studios. It's the best studio I've had. A white, light, versatile space, with lots of height for storage racks and shelves. I have a wall clad in pin boards which I tend to cover in drawings I've made and things that currently interesting me. The largest wall is used for rotating paintings I'm working on and drawings for windows I'm making. There is a large work bench for day to day tasks with pull out trays underneath for storing the cut pieces of glass for windows in progress. I've built new light boxes which are used when I'm glass cutting or laying out colours for glass painting. BV Studios are directly opposite Windmill Hill City Farm which is nice for the odd lunch break in the cafe or a walk around the allotments. 

If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman who would it be? 
There are writings by a twelfth-century German monk who called himself Theophilus. An artist and metalworker himself, he described how medieval glass makers made their glass and windows, so being a fly on the wall of the studios that glazed buildings like Chartres or Canterbury would be fascinating. 

How would you describe your creative process? 
Designs for my stained glass often begin with paper, paint and glue. Drawing, over painting, cutting and pasting in a crude way if it helps to get things going. I like to use mono printing to design my smaller glass screen prints. The process of making a window is long, buts it's the painting of the glass that really interests me the most. It allows control of the light passing through the glass. It creates texture and marks which are sometimes intentional, sometimes unexpected. The coloured pieces are waxed up on a glass easel, washed with a dark later of vitreous paint, which upon drying is worked into by degrees, removing it with fingers, sticks, and fine needles, worn brushes or scrubs, all of which gradually help to reveal the glow of colour beneath. I liken it to breathing life into the window. 
What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
My wedding ring, made by an old friend, David Bowles, he died last years, he was one of the kindest, wisest and most inspiring people I have ever met. 

What do you do when you are stuck in a creative rut? 
Talking with Ruth, who has a fantastic ability to see things differently and for the better, usually helps. Like many artists and crafts people, taking time off from making is difficult, but at times essential. A walk on one of the south coast beaches always helps my mind and soul. 

Where would you like to be in ten years? 
Having a studio space, designing, painting and making are the things that engage and drive me the most, so I would hope to continue along similar lines. I'm enjoying working with shops and galleries like Made in Britain more and more these days, so continuing to build these relationships would make me very happy.

Thank you Stuart, the work you create is mind blowing!  You can also discover Stuart's glass creations, and perhaps even meet the man himself, in our Made in Britain shop.

Made in Britain
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol

Mon - Sat:  10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm



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Meet the Maker - Christina de la Mare

Saturday, November 15, 2014
Christina de la Mare is the creator of beautiful scandi inspired felt animals.  She says her work has it's roots in folk art, from Mexico and Scandinavia.  Using simple yet decorative floral and plant motifs to decorate her animals. We chatted recently to Christina to find out more about her influences and her love of Scandinavian design...

Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
My name is Christina de la Mare and I make embroidered felt animals. The first animal I ever made was a bird. Since then I’ve gone to make elephants, horses, rabbits and foxes.

Apart from creating things what else do you do? 
I’m a writer and write English language books for children studying English overseas.
When did you know you were an artist/maker? 
I started drawing as a toddler. My mum (biased of course) saw potential in my scribbling, so I guess I knew from an early age that I was quite good at art.

What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline?
I find sewing very soothing and I love the precision of it. At the same time I’m always trying to create new patterns from stitches. I don’t like repeating the same thing too often. As soon as I worked with wool felt I knew it was the perfect fabric for me. It’s strong, doesn’t lose its shape and comes in the most beautiful colours. It also feels lovely to hold in your hand.

Where does your inspiration come from? 
Thinking about it, I think Hannah Turner’s china animals have really inspired me. I love her combination of simple shapes and retro patterns. Then there are the animals, of course, and after that come shapes, lines and angles! I’m always trying to think of another animal with a defined body shape, and how I can exaggerate it into a geometric form: a bird becomes a triangle, a horse’s body a graceful arc. And at the same time I love folk art, from Mexico, Scandinavia, anywhere around the world really. I use these art forms as inspiration for my floral and plant motifs which I use to decorate my animals.

Describe your studio or workspace? 
I have a small room which is all my own. One wall is jam-packed with photos and paintings by my children. There’s room for a desk, some shelves and a futon to collapse on when I need a snooze. Between projects it’s fairly tidy, but the rest of the time it looks like a disaster zone.
If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman (dead or alive), who would it be? 
I’d like to see Matisse working on his cut-outs. I also wish I could have seen him at work on his chapel in Venice. It may seem an odd choice for me, but I love the cleanness of his lines and the purity of his colour and the way the two things complement each other without taking precedence over each other. So I think it makes sense.
How would you describe your creative process? 
I do a lot of drawing first. For my fox, which is my most recent project, I drew nothing but foxes for months. When I think I’ve established a basic shape I make a very rough model of it using old bits of felt and stuffing. Then the refining process begins until I’m happy with the shape. For the fox I made three or four models before I felt I’d got it right. As for the embroidery, I don’t plan much. I might do one or two drawings, but mostly I like to experiment as I go along.

What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
I have a lot of framed pictures made by my children, which I will always cherish. I also have a small very beautiful china bird made by Hannah Turner that I bought for my daughter on her first birthday. I’ll give it to her when she’s eighteen, but for now I look after it, and it sits in its own special framed box where I can look at it every day. I love it for its patterns and simple shape and I love it because it reminds me of my daughter.

What do you when you are stuck in a creative rut?
I look for inspiration wherever I go – on book covers, on people’s clothes, on curtains! Occasionally I’ll go to an art gallery as well, but most of all I draw, draw, draw.
Where would you like to be in ten years? 
I lived abroad for ten years and for a long time had no intention of every coming home. But now I’m back in Britain and settled in Bristol, I don’t want to go anywhere else. So I hope I’ll be here, maybe with a nicer kitchen, and still sewing.

Thank you Christina, your felt animals are absolutely delightful, a perfect Christmas gift.  You can find Christina felt menagerie in our Made in Britain shop.

Made in Britain
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol

Mon - Sat:  10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm
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Meet the Maker - Colin Cobb

Thursday, November 13, 2014
 
Colin Cobb takes paper folding to the next level, creating intricate, geometric forms.  His origami inspired lamp shades are an architectural delight and would make a real statement in any home.  We felt they were a perfect addition to the Christmas Design Temporium at the Architecture Centre this year.  We caught up with Colin to find out more about his work...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
I’m Colin Cobb. I’m an architect working in Bath and I’ve recently been developing a range of folded paper lampshades. It came about from some experimentation with folded geometry for building facades at work. The paper mockups we made looked beautiful with light shining through them and so I started exploring idea for making lighting products from folded paper. I particularly enjoy the relationship between mathematical geometry and the natural world, the way that quite hard processes can give rise to quite beautiful forms that remind us of nature. 
What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
Coming up with new ideas and working out how to realise them is definitely the best bit. The shapes that you get from paper folding can be a bit unpredictable so there’s often some interesting experimentation and happy accidents before I get to a final design. And then there’s the folding itself, it’s kind of a therapeutic, repetitive, but absorbing task, a bit like knitting I suppose, I find it pretty relaxing. 
What is your favourite family Christmas tradition? 
It has to be decorating the Christmas tree. We have a fairly rag-tag collection of non-matching and home-made decorations accumulated since we were kids, so getting them out always brings back a flood of memories of childhood Christmases. 
What handmade item is high on your Christmas wish list? 
Well I’d love a handmade acoustic guitar, but I think I’ll need to sell a lot more lampshades before I can stretch to one! 
Do you have any tips on selling over the Christmas period? 
It’s my first Christmas selling so I’m not sure I have any expertise to share. Making sure you have some products that either work as gifts or have a seasonal angle seems like a good start. 
If you could choose a fellow artist to collaborate with, who would it be and why? 
Richard Sweeney is a real inspiration. I’d love to move what I’m doing to include more art/installation type work so it would be fascinating to see how on earth he creates his stuff. 

Which artist do you find inspiring to follow on Facebook or Twitter? 
Ooh, I’ve been a bit slow on the uptake with social media, I’ll have to get back to you on that. 
Finally if you could design a Christmas decoration, what would it be and why? 
Funny you should mention that, I’ve made some miniaturised lampshades into strings of fairy lights (and baubles on the way) which are going down quite well. I did have a plan for making full size folded paper Christmas Trees but that hasn’t quite come to fruition yet. 

Thank you Colin!  Such a great interview, we have our eyes on a couple of your lampshades (self gifting!)  You can find Colin's beautiful lampshades amongst other design led Christmas gifts at the Christmas Design Temporium at the Architecture Centre.

Join us on the 21st November 2014 for the shop launch and party.  More details can be found on our Facebook page.


Christmas Design Temporium
The Architecture Centre
Narrow Quay
Bristol

Tues - Sun: 10am - 6pm
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Meet the Maker - Anna Francis

Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Ever looked a map and marvelled at the lines and structure of this land?  Well, local artist Anna Francis does just that.  Using old Ordinance Survey maps, Anna produces colourful graphic  illustrations of well known and off the beaten track areas of the Country.  We recently chatted to Anna about her inspirations and her love of music...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
I’m Anna and I’ve lived in Bristol for 17 years. I originally trained as a photographer but now work as a Graphic Designer and Illustrator. The maps began life as stencils may years ago, appearing on fridge doors and car bonnets. I never really expected to go on to illustrate so many different places, and for the maps to become so popular, I’m really chuffed.

Apart from creating things what else do you do? 
Lots of walking, seeing my friends, being outdoors with my son and boyfriend, eating and seeing bands. I love music and am quite obsessed with Bill Callahan, Nick Cave and John Grant. My number one job would to be a musician.
When did you know you were an artist/maker?
I’ve always enjoyed the creative process since I can remember. My Mum was an art teacher so I was always encouraged to paint and draw. My Grandad was an artist and I have very fond memories of him taking me outdoors to sketch buildings and landscapes when I was little. Art was my favourite subject at school.

Where does your inspiration come from? 
People often suggest new areas they’d like to see as a map illustration. I also think back to places I’ve visited in the past, it’s sometimes a bit overwhelming to think of all the places I could illustrate.

Describe your studio or workspace? 
A tiny space under the stairs in our dining room, I’m pretty small so it just about works...
If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman, who would it be?
Peter Blake or Patti Smith/Robert Mapplethorpe.

What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
A wind-up toy mouse that does backward somersaults, I think he’s about 90. A lovely Christmas present from my boyfriend.
What do you when you are stuck in a creative rut? 
I always have a backlog of illustrations in my head, and a huge pile of maps sitting in the corner, so I haven’t found myself in a rut yet!
The Thames Estuary
Where would you like to be in ten years? 
It would be amazing to have my own studio, and to have the funds to make gigantic maps the size of buildings.

Thank you Anna!  Such a great interview, and great music taste!  You can find Anna's work in our Made in Britain shop and soon in our festive shrine to good design, our Christmas Design Temporium at the Architecture Centre.

Made in Britain
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol

Mon - Sat:  10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm
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Meet the Maker - Fiona Clabon

Saturday, November 08, 2014

Fiona Clabon's collaged illustrations are a retro lovers delight.  Her prints and cards show detailed collages of vintage telephones, radios and cameras.  We chatted with Fiona recently about her involvement with the Arnolfini and her inspiration behind her current work.
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
My name is Fiona, and I’m a collage illustrator. I graduated with an illustration degree from Winchester School of Art just over a year ago now – which has flown by! I create clean-cut textured collages and sell them in the form of prints, cards and coasters in Bristol, London and Leicester.  
Apart from creating things what else do you do? 
One of my favourite things I also do is to form part of Young Arnolfini. My involvement with Arnolfini has steadily grown over the last year, and includes working as part of the Front of House Team and as a Learning and Development Assistant. The Young Arnolfini is a group of 16-25 year olds, aiming to bridge the gap between the young people of Bristol and contemporary art. We hold regular exhibitions, events for young people, have a blog and produce a quarterly zine, plus lots more. I’ve found it to be an inspiring, warm and enthusiastic group to be a part of. So many opportunities have come my way through my involvement with Young Arnolfini, and the friendships I have formed from the group are fantastic. 

When did you know you were an artist/maker? 
I think it’s one of those things that has always been buried deep inside of me. When I was at school it was always art homework that I would occupy my entire weekend with, my labour of love was always art. Science and maths were nowhere to be seen! I’ve started to wonder what non-creative people do for fun, after all, a holiday or day trip without visiting an art gallery is incomplete! 
What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
The texture part of everything I is what I love the most! I often stop to photograph wall or rusty gates and signs when I’m out and about. Decay creates the most wonderful natural textures. Apart from textures, I guess I love it’s simplicity. Creating clean cut images and compiling shapes together. 
Where does your inspiration come from? 
Stacey Knight was a big inspiration to me a few years ago when I first began cutting. I find her images incredible; the textures, the lines, and the accurate nature of her collages. I also love Matisse’s Cut Outs, and recently went to Tate Modern to see them in his recent exhibition. 

I also love objects, for their static and permanent nature, it is always so assured and still. I can also sometimes be a typical girly girl, with a love of cakes and pretty things. Photographs are great for capturing inspiration and ideas, and have formed the starting blocks for projects. Just being out and about is incredibly inspirational, as I’m sure a lot of people do. Just realising how much life there is outside of your door step is pretty nice. 
Describe your studio or workspace? 
I am still one of those people who work from home, be it a positive or negative thing! My work spreads from room to room and I have taken over the majority of my brother’s bedroom since he moved out – everyone needs an extra room for art supplies right? Oh and clothes! I still miss the huge desk I had when I was at university, but now I make do with my more than adequate desk or the dining table, much to my family’s annoyance at times. 

If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman, who would it be? 
I don’t have a pin point answer for this one! I was introduced to Kavel Rafferty’s illustrations during secondary school, and have loved her work ever since, especially her food based illustrations for a wide variety of clients. They are light and colourful and seem full of energy and love. I also love Matisse’s cut outs as I said earlier – I first saw them at a small exhibition in Winchester during uni and fell in love with their form and simplicity.  Marion Deuchars is a more recent find, and a favourite of mine are her illustrations for Carluccios and her fantastic books. 
How would you describe your creative process? 
Slow – in lots of ways! My process of creating individual images is slow, cutting and piecing back together. I don’t think however that there has ever been a time where the time spent has not been worth it. Also slow in terms of finding time to illustrate. My life at the moment, and for a lot of moments before this, is one big balancing act it seems. Between my several part-time jobs, voluntary work, illustrating and then having some down time and a bit of a life outside of this too, illustrating unfortunately doesn't occupy as much of my time as I’d like it to at the moment. 

What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
I recently bought some beautiful green glass earrings from Cockington Court in Devon. The afternoon we spent there was an extremely wet one; images of all of my family running through the pouring rain to get there will always be engrained on my mind! But the eclectic mix of artists and makers there was completely inspiring, and amazingly beautiful. I also cherish a cross stitch that my Grandma made for me when I was born. It will always be on a wall wherever I go – a reminder of what a chubby baby I was! I also still have the jewellery box that was bought for me by my Great Aunt at my Christening just after I was born. It doesn’t necessarily fit with the style of the rest of my room, but I think is another one of those items that will always stay with me. They may not all be handmade, but I have a small pretty box on my desk in which I keep anything small and sentimental in. It is a box of memories and objects that I cherish. 
What do you when you are stuck in a creative rut? 
In all honesty, I find it really difficult to get out when I'm stuck in a creative rut. It’s such a difficult thing to do, and I remember it driving my extremely crazy at Uni. I sometimes find going off and doing something completely un-creative helps, as does just escaping from the house or the office. A change of scenery is always a positive. 
Where would you like to be in ten years? 
In terms of a physical location, I’d still like to be in Bristol, I think! (Although I did fall a little further in love with Edinburgh after another visit this summer.) Bristol is so diverse and so culturally full that it feels like a perfect place to live for me currently. Who knows what kind of situation I’ll be in ten years’ time, but I think Bristol would still be a part of it. I’d also like to travel in the next few years, which I’m sure will change the angle from which I view Bristol. In terms of career, I’d love to hope that in ten years’ time I will have more of a hold upon my illustration work, and will be in contracted employment less and freelance illustration work a lot more!

Thank you Fiona! We think Bristol is a pretty wonderful place, and a perfect place to live too.  You can discover Fiona's work for sale in our Paper Scissors Stone shop.

Paper Scissors Stone
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol

Mon - Sat:  10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm

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