Meet the Maker - Melanie Pike

Monday, July 21, 2014
We are over the moon to welcome back to Paper Scissors Stone the talented Melanie Pike.  Melanie makes gorgeous silver jewellery.  We caught up with her last year to find out more about her creative process and her inspirations...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work
My name is Melanie Pike and I design and make jewellery in my studio workshop in Bristol. I use silver, copper, semi precious stones and a whole range of found and foraged objects and materials, like pottery shards and sea glass, rusty metal, old maps, coins and driftwood. I do a lot of commissions - transforming people's cherished fragments (a grandmother's wedding ring, an orphan earring, a few treasured pearls from a broken string) into highly personal pieces of jewellery. I love collaborating with the client, co-designing a ring, necklace, brooch or pair of earrings that is exactly what they want.
Apart from creating things what else do you do?
When I'm not making I dance (all sorts, and my latest passion is flamenco), I tend my allotment, I take long walks with my camera and I cook, passionately. I also do all sorts of arty stuff, like messing about making stuff in the woods or on the beach.

When did you know you were an artist/maker?
I've always been a maker. As a child it was puppets, cards, containers, model villages, model anything actually. Later, I was sidetracked for a couple of decades by the life of the mind (I read Modern Languages at Oxford). Fortunately common sense prevailed and I rediscovered the delight of working with my hands. It was a long period of illness that really galvanised my creativity - I was very disabled for about a decade (I have Crohn's disease) and my imagination just sort of woke up. Unable to travel outwardly I began to journey inwards and conjure things up in my imagination. I discovered that I could develop ideas and construct objects entirely in my mind so that their actual creation was uncomplicated.
What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? Where does your inspiration come from?
The process of imagining beautiful things and then being able to make them real is so rewarding. Inspiration is everywhere - in the light playing on leaves or casting shadows on a pavement, in a combination of colours in nature or a shop window, in an architectural detail or view, or in the materials themselves and their relationship to each other.
Describe your studio or workspace
I work at home, which is just so civilised. It feels natural to me to blur the home/work/life boundaries. There are times when I feel like sawing, soldering and hammering, times when I want to clean and cook, times when I want to do the online tasks like the book-keeping and marketing and times when I want to nap. It's easier to accomplish things when I'm not struggling against myself. Illness, my own and others' close to me has made me place a lot of value on the quality of how I live. Change can happen without any warning and to be able to trust oneself is the best insurance.
If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman, who would it be?
I'd love to peek inside Tracy Emin's studio. She's a woman after my own heart - I love her uncompromising forthrightness and willingness to explore.
How would you describe your creative process?
I alternate between production work - making small numbers of popular pieces, like the 'Branches' range of earrings, pendants and brooches and one off pieces, which are either commissions or original designs. The following images illustrate the stages involved in producing the etched 'Branches' silver earrings. The first two show photos I have taken of local trees and branches, which I then convert to black and white images. In the next, I'm piercing out the oval earring shapes. Then I apply a resist and float the metal in an acid solution. The next image shows how the ovals look after they have come out of the acid and had a good clean. Then I solder on jump rings so they hang freely and give them some depth by curving the edges on a mushroom stake. A stint in the barrel polisher to burnish and harden them is followed by the application of a patina to bring out the etched image. After a final polish, I hang them on handmade ear wires and they are good to go.
What handmade possession do you most cherish?
Currently the handmade possession I most treasure is a set of plates made by Jen Hamilton at the Village Pottery in Clifton. I love to have beautiful items - textiles, clothing, tableware, in daily use, rather than tucked away or as purely decorative. I guess it's part of not postponing the good stuff.

What do you do if you are stuck in a creative rut?
If I feel stuck in rut I know I need to get my life energy moving. What never works for me is trying to think my way back into a flow. So I dance, sing, shout, dig my vegetable beds, visit an exhibition, see a friend, go walking, move furniture, anything to jump start my vitality and then the creativity is just a natural consequence of that. I begin to flow again.
Which is your favourite local independent shop or eatery in Bristol and why?
I have many local favourite independent shops and eateries. Because I'm a jeweller, Diana Porter's shop on Park St is a regular delight for me. I also love the Arnolfini bookshop and the amazing food stores around where I live - The Better Food Company and Wild Oats and all the funky independent arty shops like Paper Scissors Stone.

Where would you like to be in ten years?
Ooh, big question. In ten years' time I'd like my work to be more widely known. I have regular customers (I think of them privately as my 'patrons'!) who return to have more pieces made, and I'd like this to grow. I have a dream of hosting jewellery workshops in which makers from other parts of the world can share their skills - a cross cultural exchange of timeless, ancient art. There are such rich silversmithing traditions in Africa (the Touareg and Morroccans), Nepal, Egypt and the US. I can also see myself embarking on larger scale work at some point, using techniques related to jewellery to create sculpture. And I look forward to collaborating - I'm sure opportunities will cross my path to share and be mutually inspired by other makers and I am very open to that. Playing alone or with friends is fun.

Thank you Melanie, your studio space is awesome!  You can find Melanie's work in our Paper Scissors Stone shop.
Paper Scissors Stone
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol
Mon - Sat:  10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm

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Meet the Maker - Amy Hall

Thursday, July 17, 2014
Hi there!  Todays' Meet the Maker interview is from jewellery designer Amy Hall, aka Red Paper House. Amy makes beautiful wood cut jewellery which we know you are going to love!  We caught up with her recently to discover more about her loves and inspiration...


Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
I'm Amy, designer, illustrator and owner of Red Paper House. I make jewellery & accessories and create illustrations. My practice combines elements of nature & natural beauty with geometric shapes and bold, contemporary colours. I use paper and wood to create my jewellery and accessories. 

Apart from creating things what else do you do? 
Alongside Red Paper House I work part time at Leeds Art Gallery. I invigilate the exhibitions and also run art inspired family workshops. I enjoy swimming and walking and if there's any spare time in my hectic week I love visiting new places and experimenting with photography. 

When did you know you were an artist/maker? 
I like to think I've always been a maker - I have always made gifts and cards for friends and family. I think I realised I wanted to make a career from making when I was studying for a PGCE. Despite starting the course and enjoying certain aspects I knew teaching wasn't a career that would make me happy in the long term. I made the very difficult decision to leave the course and pursue artistic ventures. 

What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
I love the freedom and flexibility of my work. I love being able to work the hours I choose. I love all the aspects of the creative processes involved in my work; designing, making, experimenting, sourcing new materials etc. I also love the practical side of my work too, physically creating pieces of work that were once just ideas is extremely fun and satisfying. 

Where does your inspiration come from? 
I find lots of inspiration in nature and the natural world around me but ideas and new designs can strike at any time, usually when I'm about to fall asleep. I also get lots of ideas when I'm travelling and swimming - times when I try to clear my mind. 
Describe your studio or workspace? 
My workspace is the box room in the attic of my house. It is very compact and chaotically organised. It looks messy but I know exactly where everything is. It is decorated with my favourite photos, postcards, prints, fairy lights and my cactus collection. I have a notice board of keepsakes, a record player and lots of storage boxes! My partner is a musician and he uses the room next to me to practice his DJ-ing and instruments. Our attic is a creative hub! 
Jean Genet by Alberto Giacometti
If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman (dead or alive), who would it be? 
I would love to see inside everyone's workspace! I love to learn about people's creative processes and the environment in which they work. If I had to choose then at the moment I would probably say Alberto Giacometti. 

How would you describe your creative process? 
My creative process is not strict or rigid and quite difficult to pin down. I have floating ideas which can strike at any time, most of which I try to write down/sketch somewhere. Sometimes I just write down words that I feel are important and then I never use them ever again. But I rarely throw my ideas books away. From the writings and sketches I will usually select stand out designs which I will sketch further in different colours and styles. For my jewellery I will select a final design, accurately draw the final image and send it to be laser cut or create it at home. I play a lot with construction and colour combinations and find it extremely difficult to be methodical when creating pieces as my mind constantly fills with new ideas I want to to try. I constantly leave half finished pieces to complete days later. I'm working hard to restore order to my workspace! 

What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
The handmade item I cherish most is probably a picture my boyfriend made me of his hand. 

What do you do when you are stuck in a creative rut? 
I try to create a new collection or at least a new design one new piece. I also try to work on something creative that isn't part of Red Paper House. I like to write poetry and I plan lots of creative events and groups in my head - which I never act on! Trying to clear my mind helps a lot too, through swimming and meditation. 

Where would you like to be in ten years? 
In 10 year's time I'll still be creating, hopefully working for myself full-time and who knows maybe I'll even get the chance to get one of my creative events in action!

Thank you Amy!  We think your jewellery pieces are just delightful!  You can find Amy's work for sale in our Made in Britain shop.

Made in Britain
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol

Mon - Sat:  10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm
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Meet the Maker - Jess Quinn

Monday, July 14, 2014
We at Made in Bristol HQ are huge fans of colour and quirky design, and it probably comes to no surprise we are HUGE fans of local artist Jess Quinn.  Jess's work has appeared many times in our Paper Scissors Stone shop and last year she was also featured in the Telegraph - yep she's that famous! 
We are are absolutely delighted to have Jess's incredible and varied collection back once again, in fact this year she has her very own 'little Kingdom'! We caught up with Jess to find out more...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
Hi, I am Jess Quinn an Artist and maker based in the vibrant Montpelier area of Bristol. I have a first class degree in Fine art painting from Glasgow School of Art so all my work starts with drawing, I have piles of sketches everywhere!
I learnt to knit and sew as a child and grew up in a household of makers, My mum was a knitwear and clothes designer, my dad taught furniture design. My creative process involves different mediums, when I want to realise a character in 3D I use textiles of which I have a huge collection ranging from the 1930s to the present day, this gives me an amazing pallet of inspiration.
Apart from creating things what else do you do? 
I love movies and with three children of various ages we enjoy a wide range of viewing, my son and I recently enjoyed seven psychopaths, the girls and I have watched Coraline, Night before Christmas and the Corpse Bride more times than I can remember, we have a StudioGhibli collection for rainy afternoons, we also like pillow talk with Doris Day and House boat with Sophia Loren and Cary Grant, and the cup song from Pitch perfect is practised daily in our house at the moment.
When did you know you were an artist/maker? 
In my first year at primary school I pinned myself under my painting easel and refused to come out, the teacher wanted me to stop painting and join the maths lesson!! I remember a lot of crying and screaming then sitting outside the headmasters office with my parents, I was five years old but I knew I wanted to paint.
 What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
All the usual perks apply, I work from home, as a parent this is essential for me, I have complete creative freedom, I am my own boss, it is incredibly hard work but the constant challenges keep me very driven to always do better. I love that a creative life is open ended, it can take you absolutely anywhere, you set your own goals, you make it happen and life is not necessarily mapped out in an age or gender related set of expectations.
Where does your inspiration come from? 
I love vintage cartoons and toy design, I love contradictions and mix quality fabrics like linen and silk that evoke certain feelings with kitsch imagery inspired by 1950s and 60s toys or ceramics. My influences are diverse from mid century Japanese pose dolls and early cartoons to  artists such as Leonora Carrington, Remedios Varo, Miro, Paul Klee, Max Ernst, Kiki Smith, Louise Bourgeios, Nicki de Saint Phalle, Frida Khalo, Prunella Clough, the list goes on.
Describe your studio or workspace? 
My kids and I live in a modern house, the main living area is open plan which can be a challenge but ultimately works well as my children are a big part of my creative process, I work at one end of this space surrounded by shelves full of fabric and one large floor to ceiling window. I have three tables to try and separate the different work processes like textiles, paper work, painting and clay work.
If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman (dead or alive), who would it be?
Living artist's I would like to meet, Nathalie Lete, Elsa Mora, Vivienne WestwoodMuccia Prada, Paula Rego, David Hockney, Patti Smith, Tim Burton, DavidBowie, Wes Anderson, Steve McQueen, Yoko Ono. If time travel is involved all the artists from my list of influences above, Charles and Ray Eames, BusterKeaton, Jaques Tati, visit the Bauhaus, Velasquez, Picasso in the 1960's, Alexander Calder when he was making his circus, ok so this is another ever growing list.
How would you describe your creative process? 
It helps me to keep the morning routine of dropping the kids at school, walking home, putting on the radio and making a pot of coffee, I then start work, mornings are great for sewing, painting, thinking and experimenting, if I reach the afternoon and I'm running out of creative steam I plan a materials or post office run to coincide with collecting the children. I save less creative tasks for the evening so I might stuff doll bodies or attach arms and legs whilst watching TV. But I always keep a sketch book at hand because as I physically relax in the evening my brain starts swimming with ideas, I love this creative time, just sketching out ideas ready for the morning.
What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
Most cherished hand made possessions would have to be all the beautiful artworks my children have done over the years and my rag doll Sammy made by my mum when I was about three.

What do you when you are stuck in a creative rut? 
When in a creative rut I do something else, package orders, go for a walk, pretend to answer all my emails whilst really looking at pinterest or at a push force myself to do some house work!! That last one usually gets me back on track pretty quickly.
Which is your favourite local independent shop or eatery in Bristol & why? 
We live near the Gloucester Road and love trawling all the independent and charity shops along here, Playful toy shop for wool felt, Bamba beads, Billie Jean Clothes for vintage, for a special treat we go to Atomic Burger.
Where would you like to be in ten years? 
In ten years I would like to have a selection of worldwide stores selling my designs, to be in a position to have my own exhibitions and collaborate with companies or other designers and artists, I would like to have published at least one illustrated book. I would like to work in Japan and the US. And last but not least a holiday abroad with my children to relax and plan the next ten years. 

Gosh Jess, you are a talent, and I am sure you will have a book deal and that holiday soon!  You can find Jess' colourful work in our Paper Scissors Stone shop.

Paper Scissors Stone
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol
Mon - Sat: 10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm
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Meet the Maker - Harper & Harper

Friday, July 11, 2014
If you have visited our shops recently you couldn't fail to notice the beautiful furniture we have on sale. These beauties have been sourced, and painstakingly upcycled in a variety of wonderful colours and designs by the talented duo Harper & Harper.  We caught up with them recently to find out more...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
Harper & Harper are a husband and wife team, Angela & Russell Harper, based in Bristol. We create unique upcycled pieces of furniture and decorative items by lovingly restoring and hand painting vintage finds. 
Apart from creating things what else do you do? 
I'm a mum of two so don't have time to do much else! I am a parent governor at my daughters school. I LOVE to sing and for the past two years i have been singing in a local gospel choir which is really uplifting and so good for the soul! We like to get involved with our local community and have recently helped out with the renovation of a local landmark pub where the neighbourhood has pulled together to help get it back up and running. 
When did you know you were an artist/maker? 
I have always been a creative person and studied art throughout my education. I have worked as a designer for 14 years and after taking time out to raise my family I decided that I wanted to do something more creative and hands on than sitting in front of my computer. After trying a furniture painting course with Annie Sloan paints I felt that I had found my 'thing' and i was hooked! Russell has worked as a Modelmaker since leaving University and has extensive knowledge of materials. His expertise means that we can re-furbish broken pieces of furniture and also create a professional finish by spray painting furniture, which is more suited to the retro pieces than the hand painted distressed look. He also has the ability to create customised stencils which makes each piece of furniture that we upcycle truly unique. 

What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
I love that each piece of furniture that we create is unique. The artisan quality of the chalk paint, the beautiful colours that it comes in and the different finishes and looks that you can create with it are so inspiring. I have always loved hunting for a bargain at antique fairs, auctions and charity shops and seeing the potential in transforming old un-loved pieces of furniture into something beautiful really excites me. Upcycling furniture is also a great way to reuse materials and reduce our carbon footprint. 
Where does your inspiration come from? 
Each piece that we upcycle is individual and has its own history. I like to place each item that we find in our home and view it for a while until inspiration grabs me. So far every upcycle that we have done has looked completely different and has inspired its own colour scheme and finish (unfortunately this means that i have had to invest in a rainbow of paint colours!) 
Describe your studio or workspace? 
I'm currently doing all my painting in our house. Luckily we have a garage which has become our storage facility and means that we don't have to keep everything inside. We are hoping to convert the garage into a workshop which will be fantastic but in the meantime my workspace is the kitchen table (which luckily is very large!) or outdoors if it's a sunny day! 

What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
My Beci Whatley painting - I spotted one of her beautiful pieces in the window of Bristol Fine Art and had to jump out of the car and take a picture of it. It inspired me to get my paints back out and step away from the computer. I couldn't create anything as wonderful as her canvases but it was the creative spark that led to me trying my hand at painting furniture and reminded me not to be afraid of colour! 
What do you when you are stuck in a creative rut? 
Have a coffee - my answer to most problems :) 
Where would you like to be in ten years? 
I would like to have our business established and be making a living out of doing something that i love and that fits in with family life. However it's very hard not to become attached to all the pieces we create so in ten years we may also need to move to a bigger house to make space for all the furniture!

Thank you guys!  Your furniture really does make us smile and the use of colour is a perfect match for our colourful shops too!  You can see Haper & Harper's lovely creations in both our Made in Britain and Paper Scissors Stone shops.

Paper Scissors Stone & Made in Britain
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol

Mon - Sat: 10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm

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Hugo Grenville School of Painting

Monday, July 07, 2014
If you have a yearning to paint like a master, hone your skills or try something new, then this could be for you. In September 2014, The Grenville School of Painting will open in Bristol. 
Founded by Hugo Grenville, who is regarded by many as one of the country’s best teachers of painting, the course offers a unique one-day-a-week programme of drawing, painting and printmaking in the context of vital and relevant areas of art history, from the early Renaissance to 20th-Century modernism. 
Hugo Grenville is a well-known painter with an international reputation, and a past as colourful as his paintings. With 20 solo shows under his belt at major galleries in London, New York and Palm Beach, Hugo has forged an enviable reputation as one of the country’s leading colourist painters, resulting in invitations to lecture and teach from institutions such as Falmouth School of Art and the V&A Museum.  His fabric designs were included in the Liberty’s Spring/Summer Collection of 2011. He also writes regularly for The Artist magazine. 

The course is open to beginners as well as those wishing to move their practice forward. Hugo now lives in Bristol and following the success of his school in Suffolk, has decided to open the Grenville School of Painting in a beautiful studio off the Gloucester Road. 
Commenting on the new course, Hugo Grenville says, ‘Providing the desire and interest exists, everyone can express him or herself in paint. The object of the course is to teach every student how to develop a distinct voice with which to express his or her thoughts, feelings and ideas’. 
For more information on the courses available please see the Hugo Grenville website.


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I will always have you - Knowle West Media Centre

Friday, July 04, 2014
Nowadays, most people have a tattoo somewhere, whether hidden beneath clothes or a full sleeve of colourful designs proudly on display.  Tattoos have been around for generations and now Knowle West Media Centre are launching an exciting project called 'I will always have you', exploring the rich tattoo culture of Knowle West.  We caught up with Melissa Mean, centre producer, to find out more about the project and the call out for collaboration with local artists...

Please can you introduce yourself and tell about what you do.
My name is Melissa Mean and I'm a producer at Knowle West Media Centre. I run the art programme here, looking after all the commissions, exhibitions and residencies.
Can you tell us a little about the Knowle West Media Centre? 
Knowle West Media Centre is a digital arts charity and I'm really delighted that just yesterday we won another 3 years funding from the Arts Council as an NPO (National Portfolio of Arts Organisations) to support our work. We think of ourselves as a living lab, experimenting with new ideas, technologies and seeing what happens when you get them out in the real world with real people. We work a lot with different communities and a whole range of artists, filmmakers, live performers, photographers, makers and like exploring new ideas that might make a difference to people's lives.


Can you tell us more about the project 'I will always have you'?
I Will Always Have You is about the rich tattoo culture of Knowle West. 1 in 5 adults in the UK now has a tattoo and we're scratching below the surface to understand its growing popularity- why people are increasingly turning themselves into walking works of art. We've got a mobile tattoo parlour that is out touring the neighbourhood touring the neighbourhood collecting people's tattoos and stories behind them, and we are working with artists Stand & Stare and Play Nicely to turn those stories into an exhibition and online gallery. 
Why tattoos?
With tattoos people are telling an illustrated story of themselves- the tattoos hold fond memories, lost loves, raw regrets, and hopes for our better selves. Tattoos are a really fascinating way to explore ourselves and share really interesting stuff. 

We hear you are on the look out for local artists/makers to join you. Can you tell us about that?
I'm really excited about the next part of the project- taking some of those tattoos and amazing stories and turning them into 3D objects of desire- like jewellery wallpaper, dress fabric- you name it- anything you can do with a 3D printer, laser cutter etc. We are looking for local artists and makers to work with local people to create some amazing objects, that can go onto be sold in shops and markets. We are looking for experienced artists/makers in different disciplines, such as fashion & textiles, graphics & print, product design and jewellery 
The deadline is pretty close, when do they need to apply?
We are recruiting this July- we've extended the deadline to Wednesday 9th july at 10am. full details are here: and on our website or get in touch with me on: melissa.mean@kwmc.org.uk

Thank you Melissa, the project looks set to be an interesting one. For more information on the project or if you are interested in applying please do get in touch with Melissa.

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Meet the Maker - Alice Rolfe

Tuesday, July 01, 2014
Hi there!  Today we are over the moon to feature Alice Rolfe on the Made in Bristol blog.  Alice is a power house of local creativity, running her screen printing label (Rolfe&Wills), her artists studios and recently became a shop owner (with a group of local artists) at Paper Plane.  We caught up with Alice to find out more...
Please can you introduce yourself and tell us a little about your work? 
Hello! I’m Alice Rolfe from Rolfe&Wills. I hand screen print my drawings and designs onto environmentally friendly and sustainable clothing and homewares. My designs are often inspired by colours found in nature, and local Bristol scenes. 

Apart from creating things what else do you do? 
I’m very busy running my business, I work up to 10-12 hours a day, but when I have the weekend off I’ll try to go camping, or have a bbq or picnic with friends... 
When did you know you were an artist/maker? 
That’s a tricky one... I know I have always been creative, I grew up in the country side and used to go off with a flask and pencil and pad when I was about 6 or so, but I don’t think I considered myself as an artist until about 2/3 of the way through my fine art degree. 

What do you love most about working in your chosen discipline? 
With printing there is an interesting crossover between being 100% precise and just letting the design do what it likes... experimentation is fun, and I learn a lot when I don’t worry about lining things up. But then if you’re going to print it on mass, the design has to be exactly the same each time. 
Where does your inspiration come from? 
I find inspiration from colours found in nature. The colours in my Triangle design cushion for example come from daises and snowdrops. I also love maps, and my notebook designs are inspired by land markings and travel signs. 

Describe your studio or workspace? 
I converted a 900 sq ft garage into a print studio where 6 others and myself work. It’s a lovely bright and airy space with a high ceiling. It’s a great place to spend my time. The other people in the studio work in a similar field so although I run Rolfe&Wills alone, I feel like they are my colleagues. 
If you could peek inside the studio of any artist, designer or craftsman (dead or alive), who would it be? 
It would have to be Louise Bourgeois... During my fine art days, she was a huge inspiration to me and I love her work. Up until she died she did ‘Sunday Salons’ in her New York apartment – you could book a slot and have a group critique. I thought about it just never had the guts! 

How would you describe your creative process? 
An idea generally pings into my head. I jot it down and sit of it (not literally) for a few weeks or months. Things move fast though, so I often have to adapt it a bit to bring it up to date. I’ll do a few drawings and eventually transfer it to the computer to adapt it for printing. About 90% of printing is in the preparation, getting the images ready and the screens exposed. Finally you get to print, one colour is applied and let dry. Then another colour is layer on top, and sometimes a third. You can create 6 colours with three layers of print, so it can get quite complex. 
What handmade possession do you most cherish? 
I have a ring which was my grandmothers’. It is made up of her and my Grandad's initials. It’s beautiful, unusual and completely unique – I love it! 

What do you when you are stuck in a creative rut? 
Not having ideas isn’t really a problem, a creative rut for me would be more about motivation. It normally comes when I’m tired and have been working too hard, a nice trip to Somerset will fix that. 

Where would you like to be in ten years? 
I’d definitely like to be sat where I am now, in my studio. Maybe have a part time employee to do all the admin! I guess I’d like to have a strong online presence as well as stocking a variety of independent shops.

Thank you Alice!  It's been lovely to catch up with you again.  Your work is always to cheerful, we love it!  You can find Alice's gorgeous screen printed homewares in our Paper Scissors Stone shop.

Paper Scissors Stone
Quakers Friars
Cabot Circus
Bristol

Mon - Sat: 10am - 6pm
Sun:  11am - 5pm
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